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This is my digital painting "Colorful dreamy nebula redshifted", in reference to an earlier version. I love how the blue colors pop out like little swimming pools in this one.

Charles Ernest Butler's "Siegfried and Brunnhilde" is a copper-haired vision of the sleeping beauty, rich earthy tones dominating the scene. Only the bravest may pass the magic fire surrounding her in the background.

America is a Christian nation we're told, but to look at the place one would be forgiven for thinking America was founded on the second coming of classical paganism. The old gods returning, if only culturally (so far), is an underappreciated facet of the last quarter millennium.

I'm actually optimistic about civilization's revival later in the 21st century and beyond; we're in the earliest stages now. But like classical antiquity before it the Long 19th Century stands as the high-water mark, daring its successors to widen their horizons and go further.

Image is "Siegfried leaves Brünnhilde in search of adventure" by Arthur Rackham (1911).

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Rather freakishly, this high-water mark is also near the high-water mark of innovation and economic growth rates, and though past peak liberalism was still going strong. Hot take: Western civilization peaked on the evening of August 17, 1876.

Image is "Brünnhilde on Grane leaps onto the funeral pyre of Siegfried", page 180 from Arthur Rackham's "Siegfried & The Twilight of the Gods" (1911).

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If "Der Ring des Nibelungen" is the high-water mark of opera (which it is) and opera is the high-water mark of Western art (which, per Gesamtkunstwerk, it is), then Richard Wagner's Ring Cycle stands as the high-water mark of Western art as such.

Image is a photograph of the Rhinemaidens from the Bayreuth premiere in 1876.

In particular the economic explanation doesn't answer the question of why rich people don't all furnish their rooms and design their buildings in adornment-rich traditional styles, but the ideological/philosophical explanation does.

Image is "The Way of Silence" by František Kupka (1903).

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Alexander von Liezen-Mayer's "Sleeping Woman” shows a fair darling sound asleep, hand cutely clutching her sensuously cascading red hair, looking like her pretty little head is filled with sweet dreams after a happy day.

Fascinating comments on modern architecture compiled by Scott Alexander. My view: while handmade custom adornments and details are costlier now, mass-produced machine-made ones are cheaper, so the ugliness draining our souls is ideological, not economic.
astralcodexten.substack.com/p/

Tyler Wells's comment at Marginal Revolution on April 17, 2020 was as topical then as it is poignant now: "Coronavirus response is the exclamation point of a long trend that the world is older, more cautious, and less concerned with youth and the future."
marginalrevolution.com/margina

The image is "Sadness" by Natale Schiavone (1841).

The story of 20th century reactionary philosopher Nicolás Gómez Dávila should inspire all the budding scholars out there who can't stand the academic system, in as much as he never even attended college. Despite that, he ended up co-founding one.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicol%C3

Image is a picture of Nicolás Gómez Dávila as a youth in Paris (1930).

This is my digital painting "Love letter hanging in trellis window at night", a perhaps even more evocative and romantic vision than the original version; notice the spacey night sky and moody lighting.

William McGregor Paxton's "Girl Combing Her Hair" shows a fair darling beautifying herself; she should be excited for : low warm sunlight and rusty leaves flatter a girl with cascading waves of red hair.

I've just completed a task I've put off since May. 😮 Well over a hundred pieces have been added to the portfolio page of my website. Looking it all over I've definitely improved as an artist more than I thought I did! 🎉🥰💖

It's all here: adamasnemesis.com/portfolio/

I'm giving a listen today to Carl Orff's magnificent "Carmina Burana". "O Fortuna" is the most famous and fulminating part of it, but the whole thing is great from start to finish!
youtube.com/watch?v=QEllLECo4O

I'm giving a listen today to Carl Orff's magnificent "Carmina Burana". "O Fortuna" is the most famous and fulminating part of it, but the whole thing is great from start to finish!
youtube.com/watch?v=QEllLECo4O

I've just completed a task I've put off since May. 😮 Well over a hundred pieces have been added to the portfolio page of my website. Looking it all over I've definitely improved as an artist more than I thought I did! 🎉🥰💖

It's all here: adamasnemesis.com/portfolio/

This is my digital painting "Alien seeds drifting under spacey night sky in red", a previous painting altered to be more reddish. Not the best in my view but it's interesting.

In John George Brown's "Thus Perish the Memory of Our Love" a sad girl lets go of her former beloved's memory in a golden woods. I say after that's done she should join ! She'll feel a lot better. 🙂🍁

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Adamas Nemesis

A personal node in the decentralized social network of the future for Adamas Nemesis: blogger, science-fiction writer, artist, and more.